The Novice Foodie

Just eating real foods, lifting heavy things and learning about it along the way


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Pizza Burger

Pizza Burger

 

 

Turkey burger with tomato sauce and pepperoni for lunch? Don’t mind if I do.

Find this recipe (I modified to use a frozen Turkey burger patty, canned tomato sauce, some pre-chopped onions and a shake or two of Italian seasoning and a slice of pepperoni) and others I’ve tried and rated at my Pinterest board, pinned there, done that

#Whatdoesyourdietlooklike


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JUST MADE: sweet potato hash

JUST MADE: sweet potato hash

Just made THE most delicious PALEO breakfast! Recipe originally from “Eating for Idiots” blog.

I usually hate cooking on a skillet because it splashes all over the place, but coconut oil held up much better at medium-high heat and the sweet potatoes actually did get crispy without getting burnt.
I used some Tony Chachere’s seasoning and skipped the cinnamon to make it a little spicier. Top with an egg for perfection!

As always, see this and more recipes that I’ve tried and rated on my pinterest board “pinned there, done that.”


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This is what Paleo looks like: Burgers and Fries!

There are a lot of misconceptions about what Paleo is. I’ve heard more than one person assume it’s some kind of raw food or calorie-restrictive diet. It’s none of those things. What it is is lean beef, avocado sauce, roasted pepper and onions, and baked spicy sweet potato fries. It’s meat, vegetables and some fruit and nuts. It’s eating clean. It’s not calorie counting and it’s not processed food, grains, dairy or sugar. But it can be delicious!

See this recipe and more I’ve tried and rated on my pinterest page, “Pinned there, done that.”


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something that scares you

When I first heard about the Warrior Dash, I laughed and said “no way.”
Months later, I found myself drenched in mud at the finish line of the Carrolton, OH Warrior Dash in September 2010 thinking that it really had been “the craziest fricken day” of my life.

In winter of 2011, when I first heard about Crossfit, I also wasn’t sure if it was for me. But I was growing tired of swimming, running and my weight room routine, and by February I had decided to give it a try.

At first I only went once a week in addition to my old routines, and I was usually sore that entire week between workouts. By April I was completely hooked. Today (2/17/13) is my first year anniversary of Crossfitting and now I WOD almost every day and can’t get enough of it (still sometimes with the soreness, but to a somewhat lesser degree).

Competitions on competitions on competitions

It has been said: “If your workout doesn’t scare you, it isn’t hard enough.” Crossfit workouts are different every day, making it pretty hard to get complacent. A year later and they still get me nervous sometimes.

What I like most about Crossfit is that there’s a never-ending list of goals you can push yourself toward on so many levels. Mostly, I want to do well in the metcon- get a good score while maintaining good form. Usually for me that means scaling back the weight. There’s so many movements that I currently scale and modify that I want to work up to and complete Rx.  Beyond that are  lifting PRs. There are so many opportunities to reach a goal as opposed to a more singular sport like swimming or running for a certain time (both of which I have much experience with…it took me about 3 years to break a minute in the 100 freestyle, talk about frustrating,) or a team sport where personal goals are often dependent on teammates and are more difficult to define and measure. But beating your best time applies to Crossfit too– repeating workouts is a great way to check your progress, and every workout is you against the clock.

365 days ago, I stepped into Crossfit SEO in Athens, Ohio, wearing my Asics and not knowing what a power clean was. Today, I’ve just registered for the Open and have begun my second Paleo challenge. What I’m trying to say is don’t ever let intimidation prevent you from trying something new. Most of the time, the attempt turns out to be more rewarding than not. And maybe you’ll even find your new favorite hobby.


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Lessons from Paleo: Ingredients List is most important

We are trained to check the nutrition labels of the foods we eat, and we tend to focus on calories, fat and sugar. But what I’ve learned from “eating clean” is that the ingredients list is arguably more important than the nutrition facts label above it. A “low fat” product can and often has a mile-long ingredient list full of chemicals and foreign substances. At the same time, a food with a little more calories and a lot more nutrients gets a bad reputation.

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Exhibit A: Bars

Beside each other on the snack bar shelf of the “organic section” of a grocery store are two random choices. B0th would appear to be decent choices. Bar 2 Bar 1

Flip them over, and see the difference in the ingredients. Not only what the ingredients are, but the sheer number of them. 6 identifiable ingredients compared to….a lot. A lot of things that were possibly once recognizable as natural but now have been chemically altered.


Bar 2 back

Bar 1 Back

A rule of thumb: the less ingredients, the better. I’ve gotten to a point where if the ingredients list is more than a few lines, I just put whatever it is right back down. The best foods are the ones without an ingredients list at all (think produce aisle or farmer’s market!)


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REBLOG: “Just give me some truth”

There are hundreds of niche health and fitness blogs, websites, and books out there spouting nutritional and exercise advice; some with the factual basis to back their claims but without the popularity to reach a wider audience, and many others with little to no credentials or with an ulterior motive of making money. At the same time, established mainstream publications post content from trusted sources like doctors but without solid backing of their claims.

So for someone looking for guidance on how or what or when to eat, it can be excessively frustrating to find both a reliable source and reliable information. There are a lot of myths that have been repeated so many times that they have fooled even the most careful consumer (i.e. the egg debate). So when I see a myth-busting article based off of findings from a scientific study like this come along in the New York Times, I as both a health-conscious person and a journalist get excited. Finally making its way into the mainstream is something with real research behind its dietary claims, even and most especially ones that have been generally regarded as good advice (such as the benefits of eating breakfast.)

But then you run into this problem: restricted information access. This could be in the form of paywalls, omissions or study abstracts available to but not written for the everyday reader and consumer. In this case, The New England Journal of Medicine and the specific content relevant to readers of this article is only available to subscribers. Plenty of publications don’t give their content away for free online, and understandably so, but the point is that the information remains available only to that target audience. So scientists, doctors and scholars may get that information, but the average person who needs it (arguably more so than those already invested in the material) does not.

It’s a personal interest of mine to actively seek out nutritional information from those small, under-the-radar publications, but not everyone has the time, energy or interest to do so. Many of those publications/organizations/websites have great information, but are either largely unknown (I am still discovering new ones daily) or exclude segments of the population because they don’t identify with weightlifters or vegans (to name a few). Convenience will win every time when it comes to food. That’s why I believe it’s so important to make that elusive, factual information convenient for the everyday consumer. In time, I think these tidbits of truth will make their way into the mainstream media.  But for now, I think the most important thing a person can do is be a critical reader and see where your information is coming from. Evaluate the source of the material and check who is paying for the study before you make any drastic conclusions.

And, take everything in stride. Only you will know what works for you. Everyone has different dietary needs based on medical conditions, daily activities, allergies, religion, moral beliefs and simple likes and dislikes. I’ve quoted him before and I’ll quote him again because so much of what The Institute for the Psychology of Eating is about aligns with what I believe in:

“There’s no “one size fits all” in the diet business…. every nutritional system or expert has at least one nugget of wisdom to offer us. In other words, what’s good for the Okinawans, the French, the Mediterraneans, the Hunzas, the Paleolithics, or the bikini-clad inhabitants of South Beach isn’t necessarily what’s good for us. Just take the nugget of truth that works for you, and that works for the people you love and serve.” – Marc David